BTB: interesting information

A common tool used in BtB advertising is the “case study”. This is because it allows the reader to relate to an issue and identify with the need.

Here’s how not to do it. Statement making. Not a single mention of the customer (ok, it says “our customers” – but how about “you”). Dry text, dry facts – overall an ad as square as the block of text and the layout. A case study destined to be yawned at:

abbdowntime.jpg

Now for something more common. Some may argue that if everyone does it this way, you won’t get stand-out. Perhaps, but at least the customer can identify with the problem (or as SAP likes to call it: the business “pain” – yeuk).

IBM BtB ad

What’s the big difference? The people. We see their anguish. We feel their discomfort. We are then led through the copy by a story of woe and grief, with a solution. This is more interesting to the customer. It’s something they can identify with.

Ditto for the following, which I prefer over the IBM format just for using much fewer words and getting to the point much more quickly (essential in keeping interest going – we all have enough reading to do!):

Avinci Case Study BTB

The “Besser gut beraten” (better [to be] well advised) tagline was also an on-going campaign idea, which stands out faster and better for the reader – unlike the IBM slogan, which I think was [ON] Demand business and gets lost in the clutter of the layout.

Alex Woodruff

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